PRP for Chronic Wound Healing

PRP accelerates endothelial, epithelial, and epidermal regeneration, stimulates angiogenesis, enhances collagen synthesis, promotes soft tissue healing, decreases dermal scarring, enhances the hemostatic response to injury, and reverses the inhibition of wound healing caused by glucocorticoids. The high leukocyte concentration of PRP has an added antimicrobial effect.

What type of ulcers are healed effectively with PRP?

  • Venous and arterial leg ulcers
  • Diabetic foot ulcers
  • Pressure ulcers (bedsores)
  • Skin graft donor sites
  • First and second degree thermal burns
  • Superficial injuries, cuts, abrasions and surgical wounds

PRP in Cosmetics applications

  • Vampire Face Lifting
  • Skin Rejuvenation
  • Adjuvant in Laser Toning
  • Adjuvant in Pigmentation Treatment
  • Blemish Treatment

Sustainable Release Platelet Rich Plasma

There have been several methods reported in the literature on successfully delivering PRP to an injury site; most involve the creation of a platelet gel using thrombin or CaCl2. These PRP gels are then easily applied to wound sites through injection or topical application. However, studies have shown that the use of thrombin as a clotting agent can result in a rapid activation of platelets and a bolus release of growth factors with 70% of the growth factors released within 10 minutes of clotting and nearly 100% released within 1 hour. This ‘dumping’ method fails to maximize the cell-stimulating potential of the PRP growth factors as most are cleared before they can take effect. The use of a sustained release method for delivering PRP growth factors and cytokines would be highly advantageous in a chronic wound state where senescent cells are prevalent, and could benefit from the sustained presence of stimulating factors.

CytoCare-PRP (A POINT OF CARE TECHNOLOGY)

There have been several methods reported in the literature on successfully delivering PRP to an injury site; most involve the creation of a platelet gel using thrombin or CaCl2. These PRP gels are then easily applied to wound sites through injection or topical application. However, studies have shown that the use of thrombin as a clotting agent can result in a rapid activation of platelets and a bolus release of growth factors with 70% of the growth factors released within 10 minutes of clotting and nearly 100% released within 1 hour. This ‘dumping’ method fails to maximize the cell-stimulating potential of the PRP growth factors as most are cleared before they can take effect. The use of a sustained release method for delivering PRP growth factors and cytokines would be highly advantageous in a chronic wound state where senescent cells are prevalent, and could benefit from the sustained presence of stimulating factors.